Conveyancing is the process of transferring the legal title of real property from one person to another, and a conveyancing deed is an essential document used to effectuate the transfer. A properly executed conveyancing deed must be signed by both the grantor (the party transferring title) and the grantee (the party receiving title). At least one other person must witness it. The deed must also include:

  1. 1. The names of the grantor and grantee
  2. 2. A description of the property being transferred
  3. 3. The date of the transfer
  4. 4. The signatures of the grantor, grantee, and witnesses

The conveyancing deed is then recorded with the local land registry office, which provides public notice of the transfer of ownership. The conveyancing solicitor handles the recording of the deed.

Also read: How Long Does Conveyancing Take?

The Different Types of Conveyancing Deeds

There are several different types of conveyancing deeds, including:

  1. General Warranty Deeds: Provides the most significant amount of protection to the grantee, as the grantor warrants that they have good title to the property and that there are no outstanding claims or encumbrances against the property.
  2. Quitclaim Deeds: A quitclaim deed does not guarantee that the grantor owns the property but transfers any interest that the grantor may have in the property to the grantee.
  3. Special Warranty Deeds: A special warranty deed only guarantees that the grantor has not done anything to damage the property’s title during their ownership.
  4. Deeds of Trust: A deed of trust is used to transfer the title of the property to a trustee, who holds it in trust for the benefit of the borrower (the grantee). The deed of trust is used in mortgage transactions and can be foreclosed upon if the borrower defaults on the loan.
  5. Deed in lieu of foreclosure: A deed in lieu of foreclosure is a deed given by a borrower to a lender in exchange for the release of the borrower from the obligation to repay a loan. The deed transfers property ownership to the lender and is used as a last resort when all other options for avoiding foreclosure have been exhausted.

The type of conveyancing deed used will be determined by the grantor, the grantee, and their respective solicitors. It is essential to ensure that the deed correctly reflects the wishes of both parties and that all required information is included.

Also read: How Long Does Conveyancing Take With No Chain

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Conveyancing Deed Forms

The forms for conveyancing deeds vary depending on the type of deed and the jurisdiction in which the property is located. In the United Kingdom, for example, there are different general warranty deeds, quitclaim deeds, and special warranty deeds. The form for a deed of trust is also different from the form for a deed in lieu of foreclosure.

Using the correct form for the conveyancing deed is essential, as the wrong document may not be legally binding. It is also important to have the deed witnessed by a third party, as this provides additional evidence of the transfer of ownership.

Also read:Does the Buyer or the Seller Pay Conveyancing Fees?

Why Are Conveyancing Deeds Important?

  1. They provide evidence of the transfer of ownership of real property:A properly executed and recorded conveyancing deed is the best evidence of the transfer of ownership of real property. This is because the deed must be signed by both the grantor and the grantee and witnessed by a third party. The deed recording also provides public notice of the transfer of ownership.
  2. They can be used to resolve disputes:If there is a dispute over the ownership of real property, the conveyancing deed can be used as evidence to resolve the dispute. This is because the deed sets forth the names of the grantor and grantee and a description of the property being transferred.
  3. They can be used to enforce rights:If the grantee of a conveyancing deed is not given ownership of the property, they can use the deed to enforce their rights in court. This is because the deed is a contract between the grantor and the grantee and can be used as evidence in a legal proceeding.
  4. They can be used to avoid probate:If a person dies without a will, their assets must be distributed according to intestacy laws. This can be avoided if the deceased person transfers ownership of their assets to another person through a conveyancing deed. The deed can be used to transfer ownership of the property to the grantee without the need for probate.
  5. They can be used to create a security interest:A security interest is the right of the creditor to have the property sold to repay a debt. This can be made by a conveyancing deed, which can be used to transfer property ownership to the creditor. The deed can be used to enforce the security interest if the debtor defaults on loan.

Also read:What Does a Conveyancer Do for the Seller?

What Should You Do if You Lose Your Copy of Your Conveyancing Deeds?

If you lose your copy of the conveyancing deed, you should contact the grantor or the grantee. They should have a copy of the deed on file. You can also contact the county recorder’s office or the land registry office to request a copy of the deed. You may have to pay a fee for the document. You can also contact a conveyancing solicitor to help you obtain a copy of the deed.

Also read: Conveyancing Solicitor Monmouth

How a Conveyancing Solicitor Helps With a Conveyancing Deed

A conveyancing solicitor helps you transfer real property ownership by handling the paperwork and ensuring that the correct forms are used. This is important to ensure that the deed is legally binding. The solicitor can also help you understand the conveyancing process and your rights and obligations under the deed. The solicitor can also help you resolve any disputes that may arise during the conveyancing process.

Also read: Can I Buy a House Without a Deposit in the UK?

Customer Review:

Cristina and her team were very professional. We were kept informed at all times. The portal was easy to use and track progress throughout the process of both selling and purchase of our properties. I would definitely recommend AVRillo for their excellent service. Thank you Cristina for all your help.” – Susan, a satisfied AVRillo client.

Conclusion

Conveyancing deeds are essential because they provide evidence of the transfer of ownership of real property, can be used to resolve disputes, and enforce rights.

When conveying property, it is essential to use the correct form and witness the deed by a third party. If you lose your copy of the deed, you should contact the grantor, the grantee, or a conveyancing solicitor.

A conveyancing solicitor can help you transfer real property ownership by handling the paperwork and ensuring that the correct forms are used.

Also read: No Sale No Fee Conveyancing Solicitors

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